All Posts: RIAA

We predicted that it would happen someday, now it has. RIAA's recent figures for the first half of 2014 shows that physical sales continues to drop..now at 28% of total revenue.  Revenue for the first half fell from $3.4 billion to $3.2 billion. This is, of course, for record companies that are part of the RIAA and do not include the tens of thousands of independent artists who record and sell their own CDs on line or at their gigs.  But, most i...

The National Radio Board for the NAB met for over three hours today in Washington to discuss proposals on compromising with the RIAA's push to collect royalties from radio stations for playing music over the air.  Dennis Wharton, NAB Spokesman said the meeting was an educational update on the status of on going discussions with "musicFirst," the RIAA's collection arm.

Dennis explained, "The NAB Radio Board had a full and productive exchang...


-- Congressional opposition to RIAA-backed legislation grows to 252 in House, 27 in Senate --

WASHINGTON -- NAB issued a statement today commenting on a letter from Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (VT), House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers (MI-14) and members of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees regarding their request for a meeting to discuss legislation that would levy a new performance fee on local radio ...

ORAL TESTIMONY OF STEVE NEWBERRY
BEFORE SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE

Steve Newberry appeared before a Senate Committee today to talk about royalities for radio play of RIAA music.  His speech is below and is one of the most concise pictures of what is really going on between radio and the RIAA music giants...If they are so concerned to get paid for play why do they spend so much money trying to get on the air?  This is the most classic case of "havi...

40 lawmakers and 20 U.S. Senators. 

"Day by day, more lawmakers are saying 'no' to multi-national record conglomerates and saying 'yes' to preserving local radio," said NAB Executive Vice President Dennis Wharton. "As the August Congressional recess approaches, NAB encourages all broadcasters to continue educating Congress on RIAA-backed legislation that would financially cripple radio stations providing free programming to 235 million listeners ...

According to Bill Theobald of the Gannett Washington Bureau there are at least 18 lobbying firms working on the U.S. House and Senate on both sides of the fight to impose royalty rates on music played by today's broadcast radio.  We discovered this very indepth article by Bill that is one of the more thorough explanations of the current state of affairs...Click here to read it...
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According to news reports, the musicFIRST Coalition, a group created by the Recording Industry Association of America to lobby in support of a performance tax on radio, filed a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission yesterday. The complaint asserts that unnamed radio stations have refused to play music by unnamed musicians who support the record label-led effort to strap radio stations with new fees for airing music free to listene...


-- 50 state broadcast groups cite 'strong House opposition' to performance tax --

WASHINGTON, DC -- Representatives from 50 independent state broadcast associations wrote Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) yesterday, urging her to oppose any effort to bring H.R. 848 to the House floor for a vote. H.R. 848 is a bill backed by the Recording Industry Association of America, which would impose a new fee on radio stations that ai...

A victory for broadcasters?  It looks like it.  Today, it was announced that 220 members of the U.S. House of Representatives have signed off a bill that would stop the imposition of a royalty paid to the record companies every time a radio station played one of their tunes on the air.  That's a majority and enough to keep the bill from even coming to the floor.  12 U.S. Senators have also signed on against the proposed royalty payments as well....

No lobby is more powerful than the Hollywood/show biz crowd.  While Congress shows its great concern for the plight of today's newspapers, many members of Congress, in the pocket of Hollywood have little regard for the radio broadcast industry.  Despite all the testimony and the arguments, the House Judiciary Committee passed a bill okaying a law that would require radio broadcasters to pay a fee to record companies for playing their records.  T...

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